Authority & Nur (light), of Imam in Quran & Farmans

Discussion on doctrinal issues
swamidada
Posts: 1539
Joined: Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:59 pm

Re: Explanation of Imam Ilm, Nass, and Bayah

Post by swamidada »

mahebubchatur wrote: Thu Aug 04, 2022 10:40 am A new Video released by the Institute of Ismaili Studies through The Ismaili.
ILM is Imam’s divinely ordained inspired & guided Knowledge. Nass is designation of Authority of Imam and, Bayah is giving and acceptance by Imam of allegiance devotion and obedience to Farmans of Imam

Link to video
https://youtu.be/R-hiWIh208A

More on

Bayah
http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... pic&t=9235


ILM
http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... 0584#70584
I have noticed when a video by any Ismaili individual or institution is uploaded on U Tube its comments are blocked. I do not understand why the comments are blocked? Allow discussion, let the the truth prevail and flourish.
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Re: Explanation of Imam Ilm, Nass, and Bayah

Post by mahebubchatur »

mahebubchatur wrote: Thu Aug 04, 2022 10:40 am A new Video released by the Institute of Ismaili Studies through The Ismaili.
ILM is Imam’s divinely ordained inspired & guided Knowledge. Nass is designation of Authority of Imam and, Bayah is giving and acceptance by Imam of allegiance devotion and obedience to Farmans of Imam

Link to video
https://youtu.be/R-hiWIh208A

More on

Bayah
http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... pic&t=9235


ILM
http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... 0584#70584
A video released IIS through The Ismaili on Ghadir e Khum https://youtu.be/Va8BJmpH8eE

more about IIS http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... 2339#72339
 
swamidada
Posts: 1539
Joined: Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:59 pm

Re: Explanation of Imam Ilm, Nass, and Bayah

Post by swamidada »

mahebubchatur wrote: Fri Aug 05, 2022 9:49 am
mahebubchatur wrote: Thu Aug 04, 2022 10:40 am A new Video released by the Institute of Ismaili Studies through The Ismaili.
ILM is Imam’s divinely ordained inspired & guided Knowledge. Nass is designation of Authority of Imam and, Bayah is giving and acceptance by Imam of allegiance devotion and obedience to Farmans of Imam

Link to video
https://youtu.be/R-hiWIh208A

More on

Bayah
http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... pic&t=9235


ILM
http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... 0584#70584
A video released IIS through The Ismaili on Ghadir e Khum https://youtu.be/Va8BJmpH8eE
As usual comments are blocked, read the following message comes with video.

"Comments are turned off". Eid e Ghadir is celebrated by almost all Shias, why to shy or scared to block comments and discussion.
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Difference between Shia & Sunni Islam

Post by mahebubchatur »

What is Shia Islam? A Primer on the Twelver & Ismaili Shia

“A primer lecture on Shia Islam that speaks to the difference between Shia and Sunni Islam in terms of theology and beliefs.

Presented by Dr. Khalil Andani (PhD Islamic Studies - Harvard), who is Assistant Professor of Religion at Augustana College

August 2022
👇🏽

https://youtu.be/gUMeZq9jTx8
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Re: Explanation of Imam Ilm, Nass, and Bayah

Post by mahebubchatur »

swamidada wrote: Fri Aug 05, 2022 10:45 pm
mahebubchatur wrote: Fri Aug 05, 2022 9:49 am
mahebubchatur wrote: Thu Aug 04, 2022 10:40 am A new Video released by the Institute of Ismaili Studies through The Ismaili.
ILM is Imam’s divinely ordained inspired & guided Knowledge. Nass is designation of Authority of Imam and, Bayah is giving and acceptance by Imam of allegiance devotion and obedience to Farmans of Imam

Link to video
https://youtu.be/R-hiWIh208A

More on

Bayah
http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... pic&t=9235


ILM
http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... 0584#70584
A video released IIS through The Ismaili on Ghadir e Khum https://youtu.be/Va8BJmpH8eE
As usual comments are blocked, read the following message comes with video.

"Comments are turned off". Eid e Ghadir is celebrated by almost all Shias, why to shy or scared to block comments and discussion.
It seems The.Ismaili & Institute of Ismaili studies (IIS), have a policy of no comments on their video releases on YouTube.
Those interested can if they wish to, give feed back direct to them via their websites. Others are sharing in these forums. More - thread regarding IIS in these forums
http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... pic&t=9397
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Re: Authority & Nur (light), of Imam in Quran & Farmans

Post by mahebubchatur »

Imam explains what happens to donations from the community and the goal of enabling the institution’s (entities) of the community to be empowered with competence and capacity to manage and make decisions , based on Imams guidance thinking & values of the faith

Interview

“ MC: How is your institution organised, the Imamat of the Ismaili sect? For example, is your own property inseparable from the property of the Imamat itself?

Aga Khan The Imamat revenue is given by the community to the Imam. He has a responsibility to manage the Imamat revenue. Now, in Shia Islam, and this is true of the Twelvers and of the Seveners, the Imams or the Ayatollahs, as it would be in Twelver Shi’ism, are allowed or authorised to retain certain percentage of the Imamat revenue.

MC: Can you tell me how much that is?

Aga Khan “ In Ismaili tradition, because there is nothing which I have seen in writing, it is 10% at the present time, but the interesting thing is that, in effect, I would say easily 98% of those funds, and in fact at times much more than 98%, in fact probably of the order of 150%, goes back to the community.

Aga Khan " I am proud of two things. The first is the creation, in a variety of countries, of institutions of the community which possess real autonomy, which do not depend on the intervention, nor the thinking, nor the support of the Imam. "

BBC Radio 4 Interview, Michael Charlton (London, United Kingdom)

more at 👇🏽

http://www.nanowisdoms.org/nwblog/1988/

And

http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... 2f6d1276b1
swamidada
Posts: 1539
Joined: Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:59 pm

Re: Explanation of Imam Ilm, Nass, and Bayah

Post by swamidada »

mahebubchatur wrote: Wed Aug 10, 2022 5:33 am
swamidada wrote: Fri Aug 05, 2022 10:45 pm
mahebubchatur wrote: Fri Aug 05, 2022 9:49 am

A video released IIS through The Ismaili on Ghadir e Khum https://youtu.be/Va8BJmpH8eE
As usual comments are blocked, read the following message comes with video.

"Comments are turned off". Eid e Ghadir is celebrated by almost all Shias, why to shy or scared to block comments and discussion.
It seems The.Ismaili & Institute of Ismaili studies (IIS), have a policy of no comments on their video releases on YouTube.
Those interested can if they wish to, give feed back direct to them via their websites. Others are sharing in these forums. More - thread regarding IIS in these forums
http://www.ismaili.net/html/modules.php ... pic&t=9397
Ismaili leadership is hiding behind POLICY, PREROGATIVE, PRIORITY. They have no guts to to respond NEGATIVE PROPAGANDA ABOUT IMAM AND ISMAILISM ON SOCIAL MEDIA. Hazar Imam is spending $100+ millions (may be more, I don't have exact figure, neither leadership declares) on IIS AND ITREBs. There are around 150 IIS staff members and may be 1000+ staff members of all ITREBs on pay roll. Expenditure includes salaries, insurance policies, medical, paid leaves, rents, administrative costs, traveling, books for libraries, scholarships and publishing. WHAT IS OUT COME?!! Yearly few books, mostly edited translations or some work by non Ismaili authors and scholars. DOES IIS PRODUCE ANY TALL FIGURE IN PAST 50 YEARS LIKE QAZI NOAMAN, AL KIRMANI, MUED SHIRAZI, NASIR KHUSRAW AND OTHERS. OUR LEADERSHIP IS LIKE NISHISTAND, GUFTAND, KHORDAND WA BARKHASTAND. Conservative leadership is still living in era of MSMS. From 1960 till 2018 Imam made some important changes, leadership listened from one ear and out from other. They did not implemented Hidayat which was most important and because of their attitude THOUSANDS OF YOUTH AND FAMILIES LEFT ISMAILISM AND ADOPTED OTHER TARIQAS.
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Form and essence in Quran

Post by mahebubchatur »

“As Imam of the Ismaili sect, I am in a position to adapt the teachings of the Quran to the modern condition. On the question of modernity the issue is essentially whether one is affecting the fundamental moral fabric of society or whether one is affecting the fundamentals of religious practice. As long as these two aspects are safeguarded the rest can be subject to adjustment” Hazar Imam, Aga Khan IV

http://ismaili.net/heritage/node/27512
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Important related Farmans

Post by mahebubchatur »

“The Imam is perfect when still in the
form of sperm in the loins of his father
and the pure womb of his mother."

Imam Hasan 'ala-dhikrihi al-salam (Tusi 2005)

"We are the hujjah (proof) of God and His Gate. We are the tongue as well as the Face of God; we are the Eyes of God [guarding] His creation and we are the Guardians of the Divine Command (wulat al-amr) on earth.”

Imam Muhammad al-Baqir, Arzina Lalani, Early Shi‘i Thought (Institute of Ismaili studies).
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Genealogy from Hazrat Adam to Imam e Zaman

Post by mahebubchatur »

Hazrat Adam To Sultan Mohamed
Shah the Agakhan

The following Genealogy from Hazrat Adam to Sultan Mohammed Shah the Aga Khan is found in a poem in Persian which was written by the late Khaki Shah Khuashani in the journal called Iran." It was printed
in Leningrad by the Russian Oriental Society. Mr. A. A. Semenone of Tashkent (Russian Turkistan) was responsible for contributing the above poem in the year 1929. Comparing this genealogy with the Imams are slightly different. This may be due to the fact that one Imam was as Hyder. Mushkil Kusha and the present Imam of the Ismailis is also known as
Ahmed and Mohammed,- Editor.

Hazrat Adam
Shish
Sem
Malkus Salaam
Malkan
Islam
Haroon
Samoon Assafa
Shakhan
Adnan
Ma'add
Nizar
Muizz
Ilyas
Mudrik
Malik
Khuzayma
Kenan
Nazar
Malik
Fahr
Luwa
Ghalib
Murra
Ka'b
Hazrat Kilab
Abdu'l-Manaf
Hashim
Abdull-Muttalib
Abu Talib
Ali
Husavn
Zaynu'l-Abedin
Baqir
Jafar
Ismail
Muhammad
Wafi Ahmad
Tagi
Razi Abdullah
Mahdi
Muhammad
Muhammad
Qa'im
Mansur
Muizz
Aziz
Hakim
Zahir
Mustansir Billah
Nizar
Hadi
Muhatdi
Qahir
Hazrat Jalalu'ddin Hasan
Alau'd-din
Rakhnu'd-din
Hasan Khurshah
Shamshul Haq
Tabriz
Qasim Shah
Islam Shah
Muhammad bin
Islam Shah
Mustansir
Billa II
Salamullah
Garibullah
Nuruddin
Murad
Zhulfiquar
Nuru'd dahr
Khalilu'llah
Nizar
Sayyid Ali
Hasan Ali
Qasin Ali
Abu'l Hasan Ali
Khalilu'llah
Hasan Ali
Ali Shah
Sultan Muhammad Shah
Attachments
28DB7F92-7339-4199-8CF0-552432EC4A92.jpeg
28DB7F92-7339-4199-8CF0-552432EC4A92.jpeg (169.9 KiB) Viewed 3693 times
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Ismaili Muslims & Prophets - Jesus Christ

Post by mahebubchatur »

A lecture on “ Jesus in esoteric Islam - Ismaili Muslim Christology
by Dr Khalil Andani

Link
https://youtu.be/Kf3cYHSVxUE

Article in the The Ismaili 24 Dec 2022

“ Why do #Muslims revere #Jesus?

Muslims regard Jesus (peace be upon him) as one of the great prophets who brought divine guidance to humanity before Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him and his family).

Link
https://twitter.com/theismaili/status/1 ... yA6uxZVQRA
Attachments
0F5A3548-FA9B-4A61-AEC6-F988D5761939.jpeg
0F5A3548-FA9B-4A61-AEC6-F988D5761939.jpeg (106.97 KiB) Viewed 3685 times
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Why Imam calls all murids as his spiritual Children

Post by mahebubchatur »

Noor Mawlana Hazar Imam address all his followers as ‘My Beloved Spiritual Children’. and he gives them His “paternal & maternal” blessings & guidance (Farmans)


This is explained by Imam

Mowlana Sultan Muhammad Shah -AgaKhan III, explained this in His farman given in Mumbai on January 27, 1946.

The farman can be found in the Baitul-Khayal Khangi Chopri (book) and is directly quoted from there first in a transliterated form of Gujarati and then translated into English.

Imam Sultan Muhammad Shah said:

“Amo tamone amaaraa ruhaani bachaa tarike sambodhye chhie te bhaashaa ni sabhyataa maate ke tamone saaru lagaadwaa maate nathi kahetaa. Pan tame amaaraa ruhaani bachaa evi rite chho ke jevi rite tamaaraa sharir tamaaraa jismaani maa baap maathi paydaa thayaa chhe tevi rite tamaaraa ruh amaaraa nur maathi paydaa thayaa chhe”

This farman (Guidance) is translated as follows:

“I address you as my spiritual children not out linguistic etiquette, nor to make you feel good. However, you are my spiritual children in the sense just as your physical bodies have come from your physical parents, in the same manner your souls have been created from My Nur (Noor)”

All Mankind is created from a single soul 👇🏼

O mankind! Be careful of your duty to your Lord Who created you from one single soul and from it created its mate and from them twain hath spread abroad a multitude of men and women.” Quran 4:1

O mankind! Lo! We have created you male and female, and have made you nations and tribes that ye may know one another. Lo! the noblest of you, in the sight of Allah, is the best in conduct. Lo! Allah is Knower, Aware. Quran 49:13,

Hazar Imam

“Central to my life has been a verse in the Holy Quran which addresses itself to the whole of humanity. It says:

“Oh Mankind, fear your Lord, who created you of a single soul, and from it created its mate, and from the pair of them scattered abroad many men and women…’ I know of no more beautiful expression about the unity of our human race — born indeed from a single soul.”

https://the.ismaili/speeches/address-bo ... ns-chamber
swamidada
Posts: 1539
Joined: Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:59 pm

Re: Authority & Nur (light), of Imam in Quran & Farmans

Post by swamidada »

Chatur Saheb a question for you. Substance of soul is same but bodies have different colors and features. Is Imam addressing souls or bodies by saying "My spiritual children"?
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Do Ismailis believe the Imam is God?

Post by mahebubchatur »

Do Ismailis believe the Imam is God?

Ismaili theology regards God as absolutely transcendent:
He is beyond matter, spirit, names, descriptions & attributes.

Imam is a divinely guided human holding divine authority:

He is the human mirror of the Light (Nur) of Ali & Muhammad.

The light (Nur -Noor) is the first and greatest creation of God
Ismaili philosophers calls ir the first Intellect

The Quran calls it divine command (amr) and Holy Spirit (ruh).

This has been the Ismaili theology for the last 1000 years.

Why is the Imam of the Time called Speaking Qur'an or Speaking Book (Kitab) of God?

"Indeed, I am leaving among you, that which if you hold fast to them, you shall not go astray after. One of them is greater than the other: The Kitab of God is a rope extended from the sky to the earth, and my Family ('itrati) - the people of my house (Ahl al-Bayti) - and they shall not separate until they meet at the Paradiscal Pool, so be mindful how you are with them."
- Prophet Muhammad (Sahih Tirmidhi, Book 49, Hadith 4155 &4157: Online)
Summary: When the Prophet Muhammad told the Community to hold fast to "the Kitab of God" and his Ahl al-Bayt and proclaimed that the Kitab of God and his Ahl al-Bayt shall "never separate from each other" - he was not telling the Community to follow both the Qur'anic Text and his Progeny as two separate things; nor was the Prophet saying that his Progeny will always keep a copy of the Qur'anic text with them. The Qur'anic Text did not exist when the Prophet made this statement. In fact, the word "Kitab Allah" in the Qur'an means the "Decree of God" (see 2:101, 3:23, 4:24, 5:44, 8:75, 9:36, 18:27, 30:56, 33:6, 35:26). In reality, the Prophet is declaring that God's Kitab - meaning continuous guidance, knowledge and authority (all indicated by the term "Kitab Allah") will always remain fused with his Ahl al-Bayt and Progeny on earth until the end of the world. Even though the Prophethood and Qur'anic revelation have ended, the Progeny of Muhammad and his Ahl al-Bayt remain in the world as the "possessors" of God's Kitab (guidance, authority) and through them, the Community of Muhammad will have continuous access to the single eternal Kitab of God until the end of time.

What is Prophet Muhammad referring to when he says he is leaving behind "the Kitab of God" and his "Progeny" (itrat) or Ahl al-Bayt? The meaning of the Progeny/Ahl al-Bayt is a bit more obvious - considering that various Sunni and Shia sources report that the Ahl al-Bayt of the Prophet are exclusively Imam Ali, Hazrat Fatimah, Imam Hasan and Imam Husayn. For example, the Sunni Hadith book Jami' al-Tirmidhi reports that the Prophet recited Qur'an 33:33 - "And God only wishes to keep away from you all impurity, O Ahl al-Bayt, and purify you with a thorough purification":

The Prophet placed a cloak (kissa’) over al-Hasan, al-Husayn, 'Ali and Fatimah, then he said: 'O God, these are my Ahl al-Bayt and the close ones, so remove the impurities (rijs) from them and purify them thoroughly." So Umm Salamah said: 'And am I with them, O Messenger of Allah?' He said: "You are fine in your place. (Sahih al-Tirmidhi, Book 49, Hadith 4245: Read Online)

The Prophet said to hold fast to the Kitab of God and that this Kitab always remains with the Ahl al-Bayt. So what does the term "Kitab of God" (Kitab Allah) mean here?

Most people believe that the Kitab Allah means the Qur'anic Text in the form of a "book". However, the Prophet recited the Qur'an as purely oral recitations during his 23-year mission and there was no book-text compilation of the Qur'an when Muhammad was alive. There was no need for any Qur'an Text for anyone to possess because Prophet Muhammad himself was the expounder of the Qur'anic Recitations in every matter:

"The Prophet functioned as the projection of the divine message embodied in the Qur’an. He was the living commentary of the Qur’an, inextricably related to the revelatory text. Without the Prophet the Qur’an was incomprehensible, just as without the Qur’an the Prophet was no prophet at all."
- Abdul Aziz Sachedina, (“Scriptural Reasoning in Islam”, Journal of Scriptural Reasoning, 5/1 (2005); cited in Adis Duderija, The Hermeneutical Importance of Qur’anic Assumptions in the Development of a Values Based and Purpose Oriented Qur’an Sunna Hermeneutic)

Prophet Muhammad never gathered the Qur'anic recitations into a "book" during his lifetime and he left no such "book" when he died. The Qur'an actually refuses to behave as a "book in writing" in several verses like the one below:

And even if We had sent down to you, [O Muhammad], a written scripture on a page and they touched it with their hands, the disbelievers would say, “This is not but obvious magic.”
– Holy Qur’an 6:7

Even further, the term "kitab" as it appears and is used in the Qur'an does not simply mean "the Qur'an" or the Qur'an compiled as a codex called mushaf. The word "Kitab Allah" in the Qur'an usuallly means the "Decree of God" (see 2:101, 3:23, 4:24, 5:44, 8:75, 9:36, 18:27, 30:56, 33:6, 35:26). Several Qur'anic verses make a careful difference between "al-kitab" and "al-qur'an" (the recitation) or "quranun" (a recitation). The Qur'an uses the term "al-kitab" to refer to multiple realities including:

1) The Divine Guidance revealed to all prophets including Muhammad;
2) the celestial heavenly Kitab in which all things are recorded by God;
3) specific legal injunctions concerning things like inheritance, marriage, commerce.

None of the above meanings of kitab as used in the Qur'an mean "physical text' or "physical book." According to a thorough semantic analysis of the Qur’an carried out by non-Muslim Qur’anic studies scholars J. Fiegenbaum, Daniel A. Madigan, and Nicolai Sinai, the Qur’anic word kitab in the context of divine revelation stands for “Divinely-authorized guidance” and not a “physical book.” This is proven by how the verb kataba, which means “to write”, is used in the Qur’an: whenever God is the agent of the verb kataba (to write), the meaning of the verb is always “to prescribe” or “to decree” or “to determine” and never to physically write anything (see Qur’an: 2:216, 9:51, 13:39, 6:54, 6:73, 19:35, 40:68, 68:47, 2:187, 9:51, 5:32, 58:21, 6:12, 58:22, 7:156, 15:4, 2:180, 49:3, 5:45, 6:12, 7:156, 2:79).

Thus, the word kitab as used in the Qur’an is very expansive and broad; kitab properly means “divine authoritative command” or “divine guidance”, regardless of how this guidance is recorded or stored. One scholar of Qur'anic Studies, Daniel Madigan, concludes the following about the meaning of "kitab" in the Qur'an:

“The Qur’an’s very claim to authority rests on there being a single, univocal, and integral kitab, manifested in the past and now manifest once more through the mission of the Prophet…The logic of the Qur’an’s approach demonstrates the impossibility of understanding al-kitab as a fixed text, a book. More than one group of people has been given al-kitab; if it were a fixed text, then each group would have the same text…The claim that something is kitab is a claim to authority and knowledge, not a statement about the form in which it is kept.”
- Daniel A. Madigan, ( The Qur’an’s Self-Image, 178-179)

Overall, the term "kitab" as is used in the Qur'an does not mean physical "book" or "text". The Kitab Allah refers to God's knowledge, authority, and guidance by which He guides human beings according to changing situations and events - just as the Qur'an's own verses were revealed to respond to the community's needs.

"In this respect, the Qurʾān does not present the kitāb as a closed and definable corpus of text, but rather as an ongoing relationship of guidance...So when the Qurʾān speaks of itself as kitāb, it seems to be talking not about the form in which it is sent down but rather about the authority it carries as a manifestation of the knowledge and command of God."
- Daniel A. Madigan, (“Kitab”, in Encyclopedia of the Qur’an 2013, Read Online)

The Custom ( sunnah) of God according to the Qur'an is to continue giving Kitab or divine guidance to the communities through the direct descendants of the Prophets. This is supported by specific Qur'an verses that tell us God bestowed the Kitab to specific descendants of the previous Prophets:

"We sent Noah and Abraham and placed prophethood and the Kitab among their progeny."
– Holy Qur'an 57:26

“And We bestowed on him (Abraham) Isaac and Jacob, and We established the Prophethood and the Kitab among his progeny, and We gave him his reward in the world, and lo! in the Hereafter he verily is among the righteous.”
– Holy Qur'an 29:27

"Or are they jealous of mankind because of that which Allah of His bounty hath bestowed upon them? For We had already given the progeny of Abraham the Kitab and wisdom and conferred upon them a great kingdom."
– Holy Qur'an 4:54

"With some of their forefathers and their offspring and their brethren; and We chose them and guided them unto a straight path. That is the guidance of Allah wherewith He guideth whom He will of His bondmen.Those are the ones to whom We gave the Kitab and Authority and Prophethood. But if the disbelievers deny it, then We have entrusted it to a people who are not therein disbelievers."
– Holy Qur'an 6:89

And We certainly gave Moses the Kitab, so do not be in doubt over his meeting. And we made it guidance for the Children of Israel. And We appointed from among them Imams guiding by Our Command when they were patient and [when] they were certain of Our signs.
- Holy Qur’an 32:23-24

In all of the above verses, God gave the Kitab to the direct descendants of previous Prophets including Noah, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Therefore, it is logical that the Kitab of God also continues with the direct descendants of the last prophet - Prophet Muhammad. As such, when the Prophet Muhammad told the Community to hold fast to "the Kitab of God" and his Ahl al-Bayt and proclaimed that the Kitab of God and his Ahl al-Bayt shall "never separate from each other" - he was not telling the Community to follow both the Qur'anic Text and his Progeny as two separate things; nor was the Prophet saying that his Progeny will always keep a copy of the Qur'anic text with them. The Qur'anic Text did not exist when the Prophet made this statement. As shown above, the word "Kitab Allah" in the Qur'an means the "Decree of God" (see 2:101, 3:23, 4:24, 5:44, 8:75, 9:36, 18:27, 30:56, 33:6, 35:26). In reality, the Prophet is declaring that God's Kitab - meaning continuous guidance, knowledge and authority (all indicated by the term "Kitab Allah") will always remain fused with his Ahl al-Bayt and Progeny on earth until the end of the world. Even though the Prophethood and Qur'anic revelation have ended, the Progeny of Muhammad and his Ahl al-Bayt remain in the world as the "possessors" of God's Kitab (guidance, authority) and through them, the Community of Muhammad will have continuous access to the single eternal Kitab of God until the end of time.

Thus, the Imam of the Prophet's Ahl al-Bayt in every time and age is the bearer of the Kitab Allah - which he carries in his heart and soul, not in the form of a written scripture. The Qur'an even says that the Kitab which God reveals to the Prophet also exists in the hearts of a special possessors of knowledge:

And thus We have sent down to you the Kitab. And those to whom We gave the Kitab believe in it. And among these [people of Makkah] are those who believe in it. And none reject Our signs except the disbelievers. And you did not recite from a Kitab before it, nor did you inscribe one with your right hand. Otherwise the falsifiers would have had [cause for] doubt. Rather, it [the Kitab] is clear signs within the breasts of those who have been given knowledge. And none reject Our signs except the wrongdoers.
- Holy Qur’an 29:47-49

Imam Muhammad al-Baqir recited this verse (29:49): “Nay, rather it [the Kitab] is Clear Signs (ayat) in the breasts of those who are given knowledge (alladhi utu al-‘ilm).” Then he said: ‘Take note… He [God] does not say that it [the Kitab] is “between the two covers of the written text (mushaf)].” He said: “in the breasts of those who are given knowledge.” Who can they be apart from us? They are specifically the Imams.’
(Usul al-Kafi, Kitab al-Hujjah, Chapter 23, Hadith No. 23-4)

The Shi‘i Imams therefore possess the spiritual meaning (al-batin) and the esoteric interpretation (ta’wil) of the Kitab Allah in their hearts in the form of pure knowledge (al-‘ilm al-mahd) and not in the form of bookish erudition that ordinary people require to be learned. This is the meaning of the prophetic hadith that says: “‘Ali is with the Qur’an and the Qur’an is with ‘Ali. They shall never separate until they return to me in Paradise.” This is why the Imam of the Time is called the Speaking Qur'an and the Speaking Kitab of God.

"Harken ye who quest for union, who boasts that he seeks. Heed my words for I am the Book of God (Kitab Allah) that speaks!"
- Imam 'Abd al-Salaam, (Ode to the Seekers of Union, tr. Virani, The Ismailis in the Middle Ages)

‘‘The meaning of the Kitab of God is not the text, it is the man who guides. He is the Kitab of God; he is its verses; he is scripture.’’
– Hazrat Shams-i Tabrizi, (Shafique Virani, The Ismailis in the Middle Ages, 93)

Source IsmailiGnosis
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Article on Tawil and Imam

Post by mahebubchatur »

For Muslims, the Qurʾan and Shariʿa (divine law) brought by the Prophet Muhammad in the early 7th century AD constitute God’s message to human-kind. Since the very beginning of Islam, they have sought to understand their true meaning. They grappled with some of the Qurʾan’s apparent contradictions. For example, which verse should be taken at face value, the one that states, “Fresh faces will look at God on the last day,” or the one that says, “Eyes do not see him”? They also tried to make sense of the seeming arbitrariness of the Shariʿa. Why pray two cycles in the dawn prayer, for example, and three in the sunset prayer? Why fast in the month of Ramadan and not, say, Safar? The Fatimid hermeneutic answered these questions by harmonizing revelation and reason through the divinely guided authoritative exposition of the living Imam, from the line of the Prophet Muhammad and his Legatee ʿAlī. In this article I draw on the collected lectures of the preeminent Fatimid scholaral-Muʾayyad fī-l-Dīn al-Shīrāzī (d. 470/1078) – al-Majālis al-Muʾayyadiyya – to distill and analyze the principles of Fatimid symbolic interpretation, “taʾwīl.”

No Fatimid text enumerates the principles of their hermeneutic system;these have to be inferred. Within the genre of Fatimid taʾwīl, al-Muʾayyad’s Majālis is the culmination of their taʾwīl schematics. A deep mine of Fatimid philosophy, the Majālis systematically conceptualize knowledge in the early lectures, and then reference it and build upon it throughout. A few lectures also explicate the necessity for taʾwīl. The combination of these theoretical remarks on interpretive principles with rich and varied applications makes al-Majālis al-Muʾayyadiyya the ideal source for analyzing the principles of Fatimid symbolic interpretation.

Basing my analysis on al-Muʾayyad’s Majālis, – and drawing also on the works of two major Fatimid scholars before him, al-Qāḍī al-Nuʾman (d. 363/974) and Hamīd al-Dīn al-Kirmānī (d. ca. 411/1021) – I delineate in this article ten interdependent principles of Fatimid taʾwīl. They are:
(1) the rationality of faith;
(2) the inversion of the literary perception of real and figurative;
(3) the harmonization of the physical and spiritual worlds; (4) the mutual validation of the exoteric and esoteric aspects of the Shariʿa;
(5) the substance of taʾwīl manifest in God’s unity, God’s call, and the system and hierarchy of spiritual ascension; (6) the concept of living history, with the stories of the Prophets reflected in Muhammad’s mission;
(7) the methodology of taʾwīl, presented through scriptural evidence and rational proofs;
(8) taʾwīl as the true knowledge integral to salvation;
(9) the sole authority of the divinely-guided Prophet, Legatee and Imam to interpret the Qurʾan and Shariʿa; and (10) the rationale for taʾwīl.

My analysis demonstrates that al-Muʾayyad did not randomly assign esoteric meanings on a case-by-case basis. His explication of these materials is governed by a systematic hermeneutic that, as I mentioned at the outset, harmonizes reason and revelation through the divinely guided taʾwīl interpretation of the living Imam. Together, these ten principles articulate a comprehensive, coherent, and logical system of symbolic scriptural interpretation.” (Tahera Qutbuddin)

Analysis by EDITOR @ ISMAILI STUDIES
MAR 16
Author: Dr. Tahera Qutbuddin
Link to Full Chapter: Academia.edu
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Nur (light) in Quran & Farmans of Imams

Post by mahebubchatur »

“ The Qur’an throughout the history of Islam has been both the primary binding factor as well as the greatest source of confusion in the Muslim community.

The fact that a community is both bound together and confused by their founding scripture is not unique to Islam. It is a problem that is prevalent in all of the major religions of the world.

But why is this the case? Are we not all reading the same text? Even those who bore witness to the revelatory events during the time of the Prophet Muhammad ﷺ immediately splintered into various groups upon his death. How could such a thing be possible? Is it that the Qur’an is unclear or vague? Several verses of the Qur’an seem to speak of the absolute clarity and ease of the message of God.

And strive for Allah with the endeavour which is His right. He has chosen you and has not laid upon you in religion any hardship; the faith of your father Abraham… (22:78).

Thus have We sent down clear signs; and verily Allah guides whom He will (22:16).

Yet despite verses of this sort, we know that there is great division among the Muslims surrounding the Qur’an. So then why can’t we truly see this message? What is the vision which can truly see the Qur’an as it should be seen?

Inseparable from the concept of vision is the concept of light (nur). For without light there is no vision. The Qur’an very clearly speaks about the importance of light in understanding the divine book of Allah such as in the following verses:

O men, a proof has now come to you from your Lord; We have sent down to you a manifest light (4:174).

Surely We sent down the Torah, wherein is guidance and light (5:44).

People of the Book, now there has come to you Our Messenger, making clear to you many things you have been concealing of the Book, and effacing many things. There has come to you from God a light, and a Book Manifest (5:15).

But why must God send down a light when we already have light by which our eyes see? Due to modern science we know that it is not just any light that is required for the vision of any particular thing. Rather the light itself must be of a frequency which matches the vision one wishes to behold. Our normal vision uses a very narrow spectrum of light to see and the world of the infrared and the ultraviolet reveal much that is hidden from mundane human sight. Our eyes need to adjust to different energy levels and become attuned to these different bands in order to see what they hide. The reality of the need for attunement extends also to sound in that higher and lower pitches or notes differ from one another in the same way that various frequencies of light do. It is due to energy. In psychology, we also refer to the concepts of empathy and sympathy which involve a matching of our frequencies to the frequencies of the person we’re seeking to connect with and understand. Therefore, at all levels, whether physical or mental or otherwise, we must adjust our nature to the nature of that which we wish to sense and comprehend. It is with this concept in mind that we must understand the meaning of “light” in Islam.

We clearly see that this light is distinct from scripture as it is written down on pages such as 5:15, 6:91, 21:48. In 42:52 we also see that the “Book” (kitab) is actually taught to the Prophet through a spirit which God refers to as being the true light used by the Prophet to guide people.

And thus have We inspired in you a Spirit of Our command. You did not know what the Scripture was, nor the Faith. But We have made it a light (nur) whereby We guide whom We will of Our bondmen. And lo! you verily guide unto a straight path (42:52).

Now, what is this spirit and light? Because the book or scripture can be seen very visibly in its words by all people, we know that this light or spirit is not a mechanism for seeing physically. Rather it is the means by which the Prophet comprehends the Book of Allah intellectually. This connection to intellectual understanding is seen in verses where instead of describing prophets as having the book and light, it describes them as having been given the book and wisdom (hikma).

Our Lord! And raise up in their midst a Messenger from among them who shall recite unto them Your Signs, and shall instruct them in the Book and in Wisdom and purifies them. Lo! You, only You, are the Mighty, Wise (2:129).

Even as We have sent unto you a messenger from among you, who recites unto you Our Signs and purifies you, and teaches you the Book and wisdom, and teaches you that which ye knew not (2:151)

When Allah made (His) covenant with the prophets, (He said): Behold that which I have given you of the Book and wisdom. And afterward there will come unto you a messenger, confirming that which you possess (3:81).

From these verses, it is clear that the Qur’an’s essence and reality is only accessible through an intellectual power which was sent down to the prophets through a spirit. The next point of inquiry then is what really was sent down to the Prophet on the Night of Qadr?

According to popular belief, the first five ayat of Surat al-‘Alaq were sent down to the Prophet on this night.

Recite: In the Name of thy Lord who created, created Man of a blood-clot. Recite: And thy Lord is the Most Generous, who taught by the Pen, taught Man that he knew not (96:1-5).

It is important to note that the man we know as Muhammad was instantly made a Prophet and had authority over the believers the moment this took place. This means that even though the Prophet had only five verses of the scripture, he was in a position to guide the community in an absolute sense on the straight path (sirat al-mustaqim). Even when we see some of the later verses which specifically give the Prophet authority over all the believers (4:59, 4:64, 4:80, 4:83), the entire Qur’an has not yet been revealed verbally to the people. The Prophet is also said to be in possession of or having been taught the “Book” (kitab) several times in various ayat even though we know he does not reveal the final Qur’anic ayah until the end of his life.

The answer to this conundrum is made clear once again by 42:52. What the Prophet truly received was a spirit from God which is the true source of all guidance. This was what the Prophet received in its entirety on the Night of Qadr. Therefore, this light from the spirit takes precedence over all other things given to the Prophet. Within this light is the book, wisdom, and even the kingdom (mulk) which is mentioned in conjunction with some prophets (2:25). Furthermore, this means that in the absence of this spirit, there is no book, hikma or kingdom. When we see this discourse through the lens of what we know of physical light, we realize then that light of the Prophets is not words placed in their ears but rather it implies that the Prophets’ souls are brought into a frequency of energy in line with the divine frequency and this leads to the disclosure of all reality to them. This reality has been stated much more beautifully and concisely by the 14th Ismaili Imam, al-Mu‘izz, quoted in Qadi Numan’s Ta’wil al-shari‘ah as follows.

“Verily, God sent down the light [nūr] which He mentioned in the Qur’an upon the heart of Muhammad. The Prophet did not send down that divine lordly light upon the hearts of the believers because they lacked the capacity to bear it, due to the disparity between the Prophet and the believers among the common people. He only conveyed the meanings of the inspiration [waḥy] and the light – its obligations, rulings and allusions – by means of utterances composed with arranged, combined, intelligible, and audible letters. When the Prophet constructed these utterances and letters and enclosed the meanings that the inspiration contained within them, the recitation [al-qur’ān] constructed according to the light – which is the inspiration [al-waḥy] sent down [to him] – became the word of the Messenger [qawl al-rasūl]. Thus, the construction, the expressions, and the composition are due to the Prophet. Thus, it [the Qur’an] is the Speech of God [kalām Allāh] and the word of the Messenger of God [qawl rasūl Allāh].”

Imam al-Mu‘izz, in al-Qadi al-Nu‘man, Ta’wil al-shari‘ah, ed. Nadia E. Jamal, tr, Khalil Andani, “Shi‘i Ismaili Approaches to the Qur‘an: From Revelation to Exegesis”, in The Routledge Companion to the Qur‘an, edited by George Archer, Maria M. Dakake, Daniel A. Madigan, 306.


(Ismaili Gnosis) Match 2024
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Authority & Nur (light), of Imam - Ismailism

Post by mahebubchatur »

“according to Ismaili belief, the Prophet’s religio-political powers continue in the Chain of Imamat, such that every Imam is God’s vicegerent with divine authority over legal, ritual and spiritual dimensions.
Without the Imam, Islam would remain incomplete, as it is the Imam’s ta’wīl that unveils the bāṭin, thereby completing the Prophet’s tanzīl or Revelation ”
Modern Resurrection of Nizārī Ismaili Islam

Full Article & references 👇🏽

https://blog.ismailignosis.com/p/modern ... medium=web
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Ismaili Imams in Quran & Farmans

Post by mahebubchatur »

Concept of Imamah: Understanding the concept of authority

The concept of Imamah is essentially an expression and response to the question of authority after the death of Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him and his family). The idea of authority is universal and intrinsic to all forms of human communities. All communities, secular and/or religious alike, seek authority to avoid anarchy, chaos, and disorder. In religious communities, the goals are higher with an emphasis on the self-realization of an individual’s potential. The framework of religious authority is based on either a scripture or a founding teacher. The teacher is an inspired visionary or a prophet upon whom the scripture is revealed and who interprets the ideals of the text for the community according to the times and context. In most revealed religions, such as Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, the revealed books are the ultimate authority based on which their Prophets were considered the living authority of their times.

Most religious traditions evolve within the cultural context of time and place based on the followers’ understanding of the vision of the founder and the revealed book. In Christianity, this evolution of authority is reflected in the emergence of various forms of churches represented in different denominations with their own forms of authorities; for example, in Catholicism, this authority is reflected in the form of the Pope, bishops, father, etc. In Judaism, this evolution of authority is reflected in rabbinic courts and rabbis, who are their religious authorities.

This also holds true for the Islamic tradition, where the Prophet functioned not only as an inspired teacher but also as the medium through which the scripture, the Qur’an, was revealed. Following the death of the Prophet, a search for a viable model of authority, besides the Qur’an and the Prophetic Sunnah, resulted in various forms of authorities such as an Imam, Caliph, Qadis (legal authority), the ‘ulama‘ or scholars of the community, and Ijma’a or the consensus of the community. However, for Shi’a Muslims, the need for spiritual and moral guidance of the community, through an ongoing interpretation of the Islamic message, continued in the form of Imamah; in Shi’a Islam, this then became the third cardinal principles of Islam, in addition to Tawhid and Nubuwwah. Thus, for Shi’a the Imam is the legitimate authority after the Prophet.

Mawlana Hazar Imam (Aga Khan IV), addressing Swiss-American Chamber of Commerce, in Zurich on 14 January 1976, on the matter of authority, said:

“Soon after the Founder of Islam, Prophet Muhammad, died, issues concerning the religious and secular leadership of the Muslim community arose. By and large, the Sunni Muslims maintained that after Prophet Muhammad’s death each Muslim was left to interpret and practice his faith according to his understanding, although every Mosque has its own Imam to lead the prayers. The Shia Muslims, on the other hand, believe that the successor to the leadership of Muslim Community, both in spiritual and temporal matters, was the Prophet’s cousin and son-in-law, Ali, and that this leadership was to continue thereafter by heredity through Ali in the Prophet’s family.”
We, the Shi’a Imami Ismaili Muslims, have thus continued, for 1400+ years of our history, to accept this legitimate authority of the Imams who are direct descendants from the Ahl al–Bayt of the Prophet and we continue to be graced with Imam’s guidance, blessings, and intercession.

Concept of Imamah: Mawlana Ali’s succession to the authority

Clause B of the Preamble of the Ismaili Constitution states: “In accordance with Shi’ah doctrine, tradition, and interpretation of history, the Holy Prophet (peace be upon him) designated and appointed his cousin and son-in-law Hazrat Mawlana Ali Amir-ul-Mu’minin (Alay-his-salam), to be the first Imam to continue the Ta’wil and Ta’lim of Allah’s final message.”

The Shi’a belief in the succession of Mawlana Ali is rooted in the Qur’an and the prophetic traditions.

According to traditions, Mawlana Ali is the only person who had the unique honor to be born in Kaaba, the House of God. Historical analysis and interpretations reveal that, on several occasions, during his lifetime, the Prophet had indicated that Mawlana Ali was to succeed him after his death.

Three years after the beginning of his mission, the Prophet was commanded by God to proclaim openly and invite his nearest of kin to Islam. The Prophet summoned all and asked which of them would help him to establish this religion; it was Mawlana Ali alone who came forward to help the Prophet. At that time, the Prophet said:

“Truly, this is my brother, my heir and my successor among you.”
The most clear and explicit evidence, according to Shi’a interpretations, is in the Qur’an:

“O Messenger! Deliver that which has been sent down to you from your Lord. And if you do not do so, then you will not have delivered His Message and. Allah will protect you from the people” (5:67).
This was a momentous obligation for the Prophet; one so great that if he did not carry this out, Allah would deem that the Prophet had not performed his duty as His Messenger. The Prophet gathered the people forthwith at Ghadir Khumm and following a speech he took Hazrat Ali’s hand in his hand and raising it high said:

“man kuntu mawlahu fa Ali mawlahu“: “He whose Mawla I am, Ali is his Mawla.
This Hadith of Ghadir has been validated by 110 companions of the Prophet and 3500 scholars of Hadiths, including major Sunni authenticated hadith collectors. Ibn Hanbal, a ninth century Sunni scholar of hadith confirms this event by saying that ‘we were with the Apostle of God at Ghadir Khumm where the Prophet said to the people: ‘Do you not acknowledge that I have a greater claim on each of the believers than they have on themselves?’ And they replied: ‘Yes!’ And he took Ali’s hand and said: “Of whomsoever I am Mawla (Master), then Ali is also his Mawla.”

The important point is that the Prophet first established the context that he was their Mawla and had more authority over the community than their own selves. Thereafter, he designated and appointed Mawlana Ali as his successor, to be Mawla of the community after him. This indicates that Mawlana Ali’s authority is, in substance, similar to that of the Prophet.

It is reported that after the Prophet’s declaration, many people came forward and showed their support for Hazrat Ali, including the second Khalif Hazrat Umar (r.a.). There is, thus, an intimate link between the event of Ghadir Khumm and the authority of Imam Ali, both at a personal and communal level.

For Shi’a Muslims, the word Mawla represents the concept of authority and devotion to the Imams signified by the principle of walayah. Mawla means Lord or Master. Thus, by the famous hadith of Ghadir Khumm, the Prophet declared Hazrat ‘Ali as the holder of authority over Muslims in their affairs. Hence, the Shi’a give allegiance or Bay’ah to the Imam and believe him to be their spiritual authority. This Bay’ah stands at the center of Shi’a belief and practice.

Concept of Imamah: Authority of the Imam based on the Qur’an

The scriptural basis for the legitimacy and validity of the concept of Imamah is based on the acknowledgement in the Qur’an of the special succession rights and status of the Ahl al–Bayt. Four phrases are repeatedly used in the Qur’an to express God’s special favor for the descendants of the prophets. These are: Dhurriya, Aal, Ahl al-Bayt, and Qurba.

The word Dhurriya, meaning offspring, progeny, or direct descendant, has been used thirty-two times in the Qur’an. When Prophet Ebrahim (a.s.) was promised that Allah will make him an/the Imam of the people, he requested that his descendants (Dhurriya) may also be included in that. This was assured with a condition that God’s “covenant will not go to evildoers.” Prophet Muhammad (pbuh) is from Ebrahim’s progeny; and all Imams are Ahl al-Bayt, or immediate family of the Prophet.

The term Aal, meaning nearer or nearest relations by descent from the same father or kinsmen, is used twenty-six times in the Qur’an in connection with the descendants of the prophets. The word Aal is used by us in our daily informal prayers. For instance, in the Salawat we say: allahuma salli ala Muhammadin wa aali Muhammad, or whilst sending blessings for the Prophet, we say: sallal-lahu alayhi wa aalihi wa sallam. In both these phrases, the words aali and aalihi denote the Imams from the Prophet’s progeny.

The term Ahl al–Bayt meaning “People of the House” in the Qur’an refers to the immediate family of the Prophet or the Panjtan Paak. For instance, Qur’an says:

“And God only wishes to remove from you (all kinds of) uncleanness, O members of the family (Ahl al-Bay), and thoroughly purify you” (33:33).
There is consensus among the commentators of the Qur’an that the term Ahl al-Bayt, in the above ayah refers to Bibi Fatimah, Mawla Ali, Hasan, and Husayn (a.s.). Before the time of Imam Muhammad al-Baqir (a.s.), the term Ahl al–Bayt was freely used by all the descendants of Mawlana Ali, to claim membership of the “Sacred House”. Further, the Abbasids, being the descendants of Hashim, also claimed the prerogative of the Ahl al-Bayt. In connection with the above ayah referring to Ahl al-Bayt, Imam Ja’far Sadiq (a.s.) reports a tradition from the Prophet, which limits its meaning only to Mawla Ali, Bibi Fatima, and their progeny. This tradition is known as Hadith al-Kisa or Ashab al-Kisa.

The tradition is a long one. However, the most important part of it is when the angel Jibrael came down to announce this ‘verse of the Purification’, the Prophet introduced his Ahl al–Bayt to the angel saying:

“There are, under the garment, Fatimah, her husband Ali, and her two children Hasan and Husayn.”
Based on this, Imam Ja’far as-Sadiq established that the sanctity of the Ahl al-Bayt as an inherited quality confined only to those of the children of Fatimah and Mawlana Ali, who were ordained to be the Imams, and in this way excluded the claims of all other Hashimites, whether Alids or Abbasids.

The fourth term Qurba means near or blood relationship, relatives, or kinsmen. As is the case with the term Ahl al-Bayt, the term Qurba was also used specifically for the immediate family of the Prophet; this is reflected in Qur’an:

“Say, (O Muhammad to mankind) I do not ask any reward from you for this apostleship except the love of Qurba, my relatives” (42:23).
Once again commentators of the Holy Qur’an are unanimous in their opinion that the word Qurba refers to the Prophet’s progeny, the Imams from his family.

The Qur’an was revealed in the seventh century, in the cultural context of seventh-century Arabia, the idea of the sanctity and religious prerogative of a prophet’s family over others was widely accepted. The inherent personal qualities and virtues of Mawlana Ali secured him a unique and advantageous place over all other family members and companions of the Prophet. This also earned him a group of his supporters, called Shi’a of Ali, who were devoted to him with a special zeal and consideration even during the lifetime of the Prophet. This indicates Mawlana Ali’s superior qualifications for the succession to Imamah; and strengthens the Shi’a belief that Mawlana Ali is the rightful spiritual authority after the prophet, which will continue by heredity in the Prophet’s progeny.

In Ismaili Muslim Tariqah, we believe that Allah has always provided for humankind a rope of guidance in the form of Prophets and Imams. Since the declaration of Imam Ali at Ghadir-e-Khumm, Ismaili Muslims have held fast to the Rope of Imamah as ordained by Allah:

“And hold fast, all of you together, to the rope of Allah, and do not separate” (3:103).
This rope of Allah is the rope of Imamat. We have always looked to the Imam of the time for spiritual and material guidance as per the Holy Qur’an. The Ismaili constitution states: “…the Imam’s Ta’lim lights the murid’s path to spiritual enlightenment and vision.’ The Qur’an corroborates this, which we recite in the second part of our Ismaili Du’a:

“We have vested (the knowledge of) everything in the manifest Imam.” (36:12)
Concept of Imamah: Concept of Nass or spiritual designation

The Ismaili Constitution affirms that ‘the Holy Prophet (pbuh) designated and appointed Mawlana Ali (a.s.) to be the first Imam to continue the Ta’wil and Ta’lim of Allah’s final message’ Furthermore, just as the Prophet designated and appointed Mawla Ali as the first Imam at Ghadir Khumm, ‘it is the absolute prerogative of each Imam thereafter to appoint his successor from amongst any of his male descendants.’

Many Ismaili da’is have corroborated this Shi’a belief of the nass from the Qur’an and the prophetic traditions. Al-Sijistani, an Ismaili da’i of 10th century, cites Surah 21, ayah 73, which says:

“And we have appointed them as Imams, who guide people by Our Command.” (21:73)
This establishes the point that the Imams are designated and appointed by the Prophet on the authority of Allah.

Indeed, the Qur’anic message of authority is: “interlinked three-tier structure of Authority – of Allah, His Messenger and Imamah of Ali”. This is very clearly evident in Surah 4, ayah 59, which we recite several times a day in the second part of the Du’a: ‘ati-ullah wa ‘ati-ur-rasul wa Uli’l-amr minkum, which means:

“O you who believe! Obey Allah and obey the Messenger and Uli’l-amr minkum (those who hold authority amongst you).” (4:59)
Al-Kirmani, another Ismaili da’i and profound thinker of 11th century, explains that the obedience as ordained in this ayah is mandated simultaneously to all the three authorities, that is, Allah, Muhammad and Uli’l–amr, and that this obedience is necessary also collectively to all three of them. In other words, obedience to anyone (or any two) in isolation, to the exclusion of the others would entail that the obedience is not complete. Thus, obedience to the Uli’l–amr is equally necessary on its own. He further states that reason demands that when two things are compared, they should be of the same nature and characteristics. Therefore, obedience to the Prophet is only comparable to obedience to the Uli’l-amr or the Imam, if the Imam is also spiritually designated as the Prophet was.

The basis of the elaboration, by the Ismaili da’is, is the teachings of Imam Muhammad al-Baqir (a.s.) and later by Imam Ja’far as-Sadiq (a.s.). Imam Al-Baqir, commenting upon this ayah of authority, said that the Ulil–amr are the Imams from Ahl al–Bayt or the family of the Prophet. Thus, he taught that obedience to the Imams is necessary, as Allah has given them authority over people. Similarly, Imam Al-Baqir said that the Nur Allah, Light of Allah, referred to in Qur’an 44:8, is the Imam who guides the people along the path of righteousness.

It was Imam Al-Baqir, who first emphasized that the succession of the Imam must be explicitly by the way of nass by the previous Imam, just as the Prophet had nass or designated Mawlana Ali in Ghadir Khumm. Besides the hereditary character of the nass, another unique feature emphasized by Imam Baqir was that nass transmits exclusive spiritual knowledge (ilm) to the next Imam. Thus, according to Imam Baqir, an Imam is endowed with the hereditary spiritual knowledge or “ilm which makes him a true source of knowledge. This special knowledge includes both the exoteric (zahir) and the esoteric (batin) meanings of the Qur’anic message. It is this hereditary ‘ilm which provides the Imam an authority to determine what is right and what is wrong, what is prohibited and what is not; and, thus, to guide and lead the community in all matters of faith (Sunnah of the Holy Prophet).

Besides the above Qur’anic references, most Shi’a writers, including the Ismaili da’is, refer to many authentic and important traditions of the Prophet, of which the following are two examples:

* “Ali is with the Qur’an and the Qur’an is with Ali”
* Hadith al–thaqalayn, authenticated by both Shi’a and Sunni scholars, states:

“Verily. I am leaving with you two precious things, the Book of God and my Progeny, my Ahl al-Bayt; for as long as you cling to these two, you will never go astray; and truly they will not be parted from each other…”
Thus, in accordance with the above theological foundation and basis of nass, as well as in accordance with Shi’a history and tradition, each Imam appoints and designates the next Imam who is the bearer of the same Nur which continues to illuminate lives and destinies of Ismaili Muslims.

Concept of Imamah: The Source of Authority of the Imam

Abu Yaqub al-Sijistani, an Ismaili da’i of the 10th Century, says that the Divine Command (Al–amr) was the first and the only thing to originate from God. This amr, he continues, is the source of all the creations – intellectual, spiritual, and material. The Qur’an also confirms that the source of all creations is the Al–amr of God, which is manifested as His Word, Kun or ‘Be’ as is evident in the Qur’an, which says:

“Verily God’s Command (amr), when He intends a thing, is that He says to it: “BE” and it is” (36:82).
Thus, it is clear that the source of all creations is Allah’s amr, His Divine Command. When Allah wishes anything to come into existence, His amr manifests as the creative word, Be, which creates that thing.

This Al–amr of Allah is eternal; it is a continued phenomenon, never stopping or ending. It is the very source of all beings, be it intellectual, spiritual, or physical. In this sense, if one achieves the knowledge or proximity of Al–amr, the Divine Command, one will have achieved knowledge or proximity to God. Conversely, knowledge of Allah is knowledge of His amr.

According to Ismaili esoteric understanding, based on the Quran, there are two worlds: the world of creations and the world of Al–amr or the Divine Command.

“Is not the creation (khalq) and the Divine Command (Al–amr) His? (7:54)
“O my people, this life of the world is only a passing comfort and surely the hereafter is the abode to settle” (40:39).
Based on these verses, most Ismaili writers explain that there are two complementary worlds: Alam al–Khalq, the world of creations and Alam al–amr, the world of the Divine Command; the latter is also called the world of Religion.

Al–Mu’ayyad fid–din Al–Shirazi, an Ismaili 12th century da’i quotes two similar verses from the Qur’an which says: “God has created (all things) in twins” and concludes that everything God has created consists of symbol and what it represents; form and its substance; or Zahir and Batin. For instance, man’s body is symbol or Zahir and his soul is Batin, the physical world is Zahir and the spiritual world or the world of the Divine Command is Batin; the revelation (tanzil) of the Qur’an is Zahir and the Ta’wil (esoteric understanding) given by the Imam is Batin. In short, this world of creations is a manifestation of ‘that world of reality.’ Al-Mu’ayyad then concludes that all material things in this world are symbols and their Batini realities belong to the world of the Divine Command.

Nasiruddin Tusi, (1202-1274) another Ismaili thinker, says that things in this world exist because the source of this world is the Divine Command or Al–amr of Allah. However, Tusi further states that just as every reality in that world has its counterpart in this world, Al–amr or the Divine Command of God also has its manifestation in this world, which is a link between this world and Allah. This manifestation, according to the Shi’a understanding and interpretation, is the Uli‘l–amr, those vested with authority; they are, the Holy Prophet in his time and the Imams in their times.

In Arabic, the word Uli’l amr is composed of two separate words. The first word is Uli, which means possessors; and the second word is Al–amr, which means the Divine Command. In this sense, the esoteric meaning of the complete phrase Uli’l–amr is the Imams who are manifesting the Divine Command in this world.

For all Shi‘a, including Ismaili Muslims, this verse clearly makes the Imam the spiritual authority; and is, therefore, the basis for which the murid gives Bay’ah to the Imam of the-Time. In other words, since Al–amr, or the Divine Command, is the source of the Imam of the-Time, he guides us both in the spiritual and temporal matters and leads us to the sirat al–mustaqim (the straight path).

Another important concept in Shi’ah Islam is the Nur or Light. The Qur’an says:

“There has come to you from Allah Nur and a clear Book” (5:15).
This verse makes it very clear that along with the Qur’an, Allah has sent Nur. In essence, therefore, the intent in this verse is that the teaching, Ta’lim, and interpretation, Ta’wil, of the Qur’an may be understood with the blessings of the Light that Allah has sent.

Abu’l Fawaris, an 11th Century Ismaili thinker says that although we have perfect sight, we need external light to see things through. Similarly, although Allah has bestowed human beings with intellect, we need the light of religion. Who is this light of religion? What is the Shi’a understanding of this Nur?

The Qur’an teaches us that Allah is the Creator of the whole universe; it says:

“Allah is the light of the heavens and the earth” (24:35).
The Qur’an also guides that it is Allah Who sends the Light, and guides us towards Him through His Light, as indicated in the following verses:

“O mankind! Truly there has come to you a proof from your Lord, and We have sent down to you a clear Light” (4:174).
” …God guides whoever seeks His good pleasure to ways of peace. He brings them out of darkness into Light by His leave, and guides them to a straight path” (5:16).
What is this special light that Allah has bestowed upon us? It is a light which guides us and makes things clear for us. As Shi’a Muslims, we believe that it is the Light of Imamat. The Ta’lim curriculum (Grade-4) discusses this notion very beautifully:

“Allah has given us physical light. He has also given us another kind of light… It is the light of Imamat. We call it the Nur of Imamat. The Imam’s Nur is not like ordinary light… It is a spiritual light which leads us towards inner peace and happiness. The Nur of Imamat will always be there to guide us in our lives.”

The Qur’an addresses the Prophet with many attributes; one of which is sirajan muniran, meaning the Lamp, which gives Light or Nur. In a hadith, the Prophet is reported to have said:

“Ana wa Ali min nurin wahidin,” meaning “Ali and I are from the same Nur.”
It is in this context, the Shi’a affirms that the Nur of Imamat, starting from Mawlana Ali (a.s.), is the Light which guides murids “to the spiritual enlightenment; or the Nur of Imamat brings murid closer to ‘Allah, Who is above all else.’

Concept of Imamah: Imam as the Intercessor

The Imam’s role as the intercessor with particular emphasis on murids’ responsibility for good deeds and ethical behavior to become receptacle for Allah’s bounty.

One of the important concepts in the Shi’a interpretation for the necessity of the Imam is wasilah, meaning intercessor, that is, the one who intercedes (meaning to ask on behalf of someone or to mediate). In the third part of our Du’a we recite: tawassalu ‘indal masa‘ib bi Mawla kumil…, meaning, “Seek at the time of difficulties, the help or intercession of your Mawla…” The Qur’an also asks us to seek al–wasilah or the intercessor to come close to Allah. He says:

“O you who believe, fear God and seek (the intercessor) al–wasilah to reach Him” (5:35).
According to the Shi’a interpretation, after the Prophet, Imams from his progeny, who are bearers of Nur of Imamah, are the intercessors who bring believers closer to Allah. It is in the context of this Shi’a belief that we seek blessings and help from the Imam of the-Time. As Ismaili murids, we seek the Imam’s intercession through various forms of practices of faith, including rites and ceremonies.

For instance, based on teachings of the Imam, the practice of Dhikar Tasbih (remembering God) is a form of niyamat or blessing from the Imam. It is an intense communication from the heart; and is so highly emotive that it has the potential to spark and engender great feelings in the individual. In our Ismaili Tariqah, the authority of the Imam, the Murshid, is attested to through Bay’ah by the murid to the Imam of the-Time. Bay’ah is the act of acceptance by the murid to the permanent spiritual bond between the Imam and the murid. It is in the context of this relationship that we as murids approach our Murshid, the Imam of the time, to intercede on our behalf and for his blessings, especially when faced with hardship

BY ISMAILIMAIL POSTED ON JUNE 24, 2024
By: Sadruddin Noorani, Chicago, USA
mahebubchatur
Posts: 641
Joined: Mon Jan 13, 2014 7:01 pm

Re: Authority & Nur (light), of Imam - Ismailism

Post by mahebubchatur »

mahebubchatur wrote: Mon Jun 03, 2024 3:47 pm “according to Ismaili belief, the Prophet’s religio-political powers continue in the Chain of Imamat, such that every Imam is God’s vicegerent with divine authority over legal, ritual and spiritual dimensions.
Without the Imam, Islam would remain incomplete, as it is the Imam’s ta’wīl that unveils the bāṭin, thereby completing the Prophet’s tanzīl or Revelation ”
Modern Resurrection of Nizārī Ismaili Islam

Full Article & references 👇🏽

https://blog.ismailignosis.com/p/modern ... medium=web
More at viewtopic.php?p=70584#p70584
swamidada
Posts: 1539
Joined: Sun Aug 02, 2020 8:59 pm

Re: Authority & Nur (light), of Imam in Quran & Farmans

Post by swamidada »

Repeatation. Above you have posted same on June 3, 2024 at 3.47pm.
Post Reply